Category Archives: Book Review

Boystown

Marshal Thornton is a novelist, playwright, and screenwriter living in Long Beach, California. He is best known for writing the Boystown detective series. I just finished reading the two Boystown novella prequels: Little Boy Dead and Little Boy Afraid. The books revolve around former Chicago policeman turned private investigator Nick Nowak.

Little Boy Dead takes place during the 1979 Film Fest Chicago where Nick has gotten a job as a driver and as head of security. In a very short time, Nick deals with stalking fans, a crowd of protesters, and a critic’s stolen wallet that leads to murder. The novella is fast paced and an easy read. Oh and Nick is a bit of a slut since the breakup with his boyfriend, so there are plenty of steamy sex scenes.

As soon as I finished reading the first prequel, I immediately started on Little Boy Afraid. It’s now the winter of 1980 and Nick has one of his first jobs working for an openly-gay state senate candidate. The candidate has been receiving death threats, a lot of them, and it’s Nick’s job to keep him alive until the election.

I really enjoyed both novellas. I love how he adds a little bit of history in the novellas such as the peanut farmer running for president. I have one question though: who ran for president in 1980 who became famous selling 20 Mule Team Borax? The choices seem to be Ted Kennedy, U.S. senator from Massachusetts, Jerry Brown, governor of California, and Cliff Finch, former governor of Mississippi. None seem to fit the bill.

I highly recommend the Boystown prequels. I can’t wait to delve into Thornton’s other Boystown detective books.


Third Hill North of Town

I just finished The Third Hill North Of Town by Noah Bly, aka Bart Yates. Overall, I enjoyed the book and wasn’t even upset with the ending. The book is quite a journey.

Set against the turbulent backdrop of the 1960s, Noah Bly’s evocative The Third Hill North Of Town explores prejudice, loss, and redeeming courage through the prism of an unlikely friendship.

When fifty-four-year-old Julianna Dapper slips out of a mental hospital in Bangor, Maine, on a June day in 1962, it’s with one purpose in mind. Julianna knows she must go back to the tiny farming community in northern Missouri where she was born and raised. It’s the place where she and her best friend, Ben Taylor, roamed as children, and where her life’s course shifted irrevocably one night long ago.

Embarking on her journey, Julianna meets Elijah Hunter, a shy teenaged African-American boy, and Jon Tate, a young hitchhiker on the run from the law. The three become traveling companions, bound together by quirks of happenstance. And even as the emerging truth about Julianna’s past steers them inexorably toward tragedy, their surprising bond may be the means to transform fear and heartache into the strength that finally guides Julianna home.

The Third Hill North of Town is a haunting, imaginative story of human connection and coincidence–a poignant and powerful novel that ripples with wit and heart.


White Creek

Yesterday, I finished a book, White Creek: A Fable, that I want to tell you about. It’s a witty, haunting tale of family and friendship, regret and redemption, set on a remote Wyoming cattle ranch in the dead of winter.

The White Creek Ranch has been in Hap Cobb’s family for over a century and a half, but Hap is now eighty-two, and the last surviving member of his family. Tart-tongued, moody, and all too often “a miserable old fart” (in the words of his long-suffering ranch hand and closest friend, Aaron Littlefield), Hap has no rival as a home cook, owns the best-stocked private library in the state, and prides himself on his “God-given ability” to exasperate everyone he meets. He is also a world classed foul mouthed old man. My favorite expletive statement he makes in the book is the hilarious “He’s happier than a two twatted whore in a room full of Siamese twins.” The enormous ranch house he inherited long ago from his grandfather stands mostly empty these days, save for Hap and Aaron, and while their life together is both busy and comfortable, Hap often loses himself in his past, knowing he has little future left.

When a sudden blizzard hits one January evening, however, and Aaron opens the door to a young woman and a teenaged boy seeking shelter from the storm, everything Hap thought he knew about the world begins to shift. With these two unlooked-for houseguests, the White Creek Ranch soon becomes a wellspring of mystery and possibility, and will never be the same again.

A story of magical realism in the tradition of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and John Crowley. It’s a book with magic or the supernatural, however you want to think of it, presented in an otherwise real-world setting. The supernatural only begins at the end though you realize that it’s been going on throughout the book.

White Creek: A Fable is by Bart Yates, who lives in Iowa City, Iowa, and is the author of four previous novels: Leave Myself Behind (winner of the 2004 Alex Award), The Brothers Bishop, The Distance Between Us, and (writing as Noah Bly) The Third Hill North Of Town. When I first read Leave Myself Behind I loved it so much that I read it again. I never read a book twice, but this one I loved. I’ve devoured each of his books since. I have yet to read The Third Hill North Of Town, but it is on its way from Amazon. Yates has a way with words like few authors I’ve ever read. You will care about and fall in love with the characters. While White Creek is the latest of his books I’ve loved and read, I urge you to pick up any of these books and give them a read. I don’t think you’ll regret it.

Yates books Leave Myself Behind, The Brothers Bishop, and The Distance Between Us represent gay fiction at its zenith. White Creek isn’t gay fiction but it is a damn good book, and I expect no less of The Third Hill North Of Town.


Pump Jockey, Part II

On Saturday, I wrote about the short story “Pump Jockey.” While I enjoyed the short story, I’m afraid some may have thought that I was recommending the longer book The Winter of My Discotheque. The truth is, I wouldn’t particularly recommend the book that expanded on the short story. The book wasn’t terrible, but from what I remember of it, it’s not one I’d highly recommend either. However, Rebel Yell: Stories by Contemporary Southern Gay Authors from which the short story came, is highly recommended. I also recommend Rebel Yell 2: More Stories by Contemporary Southern Gay Authors. The two short story collections have everything from gay southern gothic to just good old storytelling.


Cajun Country 

I’m down in the bayou as they say. I’m visiting my best friend in Louisiana for a couple of days. I’ll head back to Alabama on Thursday. It’s a long drive down but the traffic was mostly good.

On my way down I listened to Heidi Cullinan’s Short Stay. It’s part of the Love Lessons series and was pretty good. If you’ve read and liked the rest of the series, you’ll like this one too.


Reading 

I spent the evening reading and time got away from me. Before I knew it, it was time for bed and I had not written a blog post. Since I didn’t have time to ponder what to write, and I didn’t have anything specific in mind, I thought I’d just confess to reading and losing track of time. By the way, I am reading Tal Bauer’s book Enemy of My Enemy, which is the second book in her Executive Office Series. It continues the story of Pressient Jack Spiers and his lover Ethan Reichenbach. It’s a great political thriller and I hated to have to put it down and go to bed.


Busy Week

Yesterday, I gave a presentation on Pearl Harbor, which went exceedingly well. I was happy to have a World War II veteran there to view the presentation. Tonight, I have another event; I will be serving as host to a book discussion. The book to be discussed is Doris Kearns Goodwin’s No Ordinary Time. An incredibly detailed book, No Ordinary Time tells the story of Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt and the American Homefront during World War II.

A compelling chronicle of a nation and its leaders during the period when modern America was created. With an uncanny feel for detail and a novelist’s grasp of drama and depth, Doris Kearns Goodwin brilliantly narrates the interrelationship between the inner workings of the Roosevelt White House and the destiny of the United States. Goodwin paints a comprehensive, intimate portrait that fills in a historical gap in the story of our nation under the Roosevelts.


Balance

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I wasn’t up last night to writing a lengthy blog post. I was reading a book: LIfe Lessons by Kaje Harper. Sometimes you need balance in your life and last night I felt more like reading than writing. It was a good book, and I am glad I finished it. It’s book one in a series of four, and I think I’ll be beginning book two today if I have some free time at work.


Enemies of the State: The Executive Office


I’m very happy that my good friend Susan brought this book to my attention. It is exactly the type of book I like. I love mysteries, suspense, and political thrillers like those written by Dan Brown, Tom Clancy, or Steve Berry, but they never have any gay characters in them, not even secondary characters as there would be in real life. So it was great to see this kind of book written with gay main characters.

Enemies of the State: The Executive Office by Tal Bauer ranks right up there with anything by Brown, Berry, or Clancy. It’s a masterpiece of political intrigue and plot twists set in the near future, and is terrifyingly possible. It builds slowly although I loved the first half of the book as much as the second half (maybe more). And once you hit the halfway mark, hold onto your seat and make sure you have no other plans, because you will not want to put this book down.

This story will have you laughing and crying, but every word is worth it. You’ll fall in love with Jack and Ethan as they are the rollercoaster that brings this wild ride home. A rollercoaster is a great way to describe this book with all it’s twists and turns that build you up and up to the pinnacle at the midway point and then it’s a fast ride to the finish. The whole ride is thrilling. Enemies of the State: The Executive Office is book one of a three-book series, and I cannot wait for book two to release in the fall.

I haven’t read much in the last six months. My friend who passed away was my main reading partner and we loved to discuss books with one another. He was a particularly big fan of Amy Lane and as much as I love her books, I haven’t been able to pick up one of hers since his death. But I am back to reading now, and loving every minute of it.  Here are a few other books I have recently read:

The Orion Mask by Greg Herren

Dark Tide by Greg Herren

How to Howl at the Moon by Eli Easton

Superhero by Eli Easton

The Skyler Foxe Mysteries (five full-length mysteries, one novella and two collections of short stories) by Haley Walsh

All of the books are worth your time. I just happened to be so blown away by Enemies of the State that I felt it needed a good review and I hope you will check it out.


The Porn Phenomenon

Josh McDowell, a well-known evangelist and apologist, commissioned a new study to expose what he calls the “pervasiveness of pornography in the church and among Christians” and to his disbelief, the statistics proved what he had already feared – “pornography has infiltrated the church, especially among young adults.”
“Of young adults 18-24 years old, 76 percent actively – and these are Christians – actively seek out porn,” McDowell lamented to OneNewsNow.
Here are some additional key findings from the church commissioned study titled: “THE PORN PHENOMENON: A COMPREHENSIVE, GROUNDBREAKING NEW SURVEY ON AMERICANS, THE CHURCH, AND PORNOGRAPHY: Impact of Internet Pornography on American Population and the Church.”
  • 21% of youth pastors and 14% of pastors admit they currently struggle with using porn.
  • About 12% of Youth Pastors and 5% of Pastors say there are addicted to porn
  • 87% of pastors who use porn feel a great sense of shame about it
  • 55% of pastors who use porn say they live in constant fear of being discovered
OneNewsNow reports on McDowell’s one man crusade to turn the tide on all those young Christian’s addicted to playing with themselves.
McDowell tells OneNewsNow young people have a cavalier attitude towards porn.
 
“Of 13- to 24-year-olds, 96 percent would say that when they talk to someone about porn – their friends, which most of them are Christians now – they do it in either a neutral, positive or encouraging way,” he says.
 
McDowell is putting together what he calls the most comprehensive conference for Christian leaders about Internet pornography. Called “Set Free Summit,” it will take place in April in Greensboro, North Carolina.
Source: The Daily Grind, February 5, 2016

 

Read more: http://2anothercountry.blogspot.com/2016/02/church-funded-study-finds-76-of-young.html#ixzz3zOufwhQs


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