We Are Marching

We Are Marching
By Carrie Law Morgan Figgs

                      1.
We are marching, truly marching
  Can’t you hear the sound of feet?
We are fearing no impediment
  We have never known defeat.

                      2.
Like Job of old we have had patience,
  Like Joshua, dangerous roads we’ve trod
Like Solomon we have built out temples.
  Like Abraham we’ve had faith in God.

                      3.
Up the streets of wealth and commerce,
  We are marching one by one
We are marching, making history,
  For ourselves and those to come.

                      4.
We have planted schools and churches,
  We have answered duty’s call.
We have marched from slavery’s cabin
  To the legislative hall.

                      5.
Brethren can’t you catch the spirit?
  You who are out just get in line
Because we are marching, yes we are marching
  To the music of the time.

                      6.
We are marching, steady marching
  Bridging chasms, crossing streams
Marching up the hill of progress
  Realizing our fondest dreams.

                      7.
We are marching, truly marching
  Can’t you hear the sound of feet?
We are fearing no impediment
  We shall never know defeat.

Yesterday, in the landmark decision Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, the Supreme Court ruled in a 6-3 decision that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects employees against discrimination due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. The ruling was met with widespread praise among LGBTQ rights groups, which have long argued against such employment discrimination. While this year, the LGBTQ community cannot physically march in Pride parades around the country, we are symbolically marching closer to equality through the courts, and if Joe Biden wins the presidency in November, we will be making even greater strides.

Carrie Law Morgan Figgs was born in 1878. A teacher, community leader, playwright, and poet, Figgs was the author of Poetic Pearls (Edward Waters College Press, 1920) and Nuggets of Gold (Jaxon Printing Company, 1921), as well as several plays. She died in 1968.

About Joe

I began my life in the South and for five years lived as a closeted teacher, but am now making a new life for myself as an oral historian in New England. I think my life will work out the way it was always meant to be. That doesn't mean there won't be ups and downs; that's all part of life. It means I just have to be patient. I feel like October 7, 2015 is my new birthday. It's a beginning filled with great hope. It's a second chance to live my life…not anyone else's. My profile picture is "David and Me," 2001 painting by artist Steve Walker. It happens to be one of my favorite modern gay art pieces. View all posts by Joe

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