Moment of Zen: Music

Music can be very therapeutic. Music therapy is an interpersonal process in which the therapist uses music and all of its facets-physical, emotional, mental, social, aesthetic, and spiritual-to help clients to improve or maintain their health. Music has been used as a healing force for centuries. Music therapy goes back to biblical times, when David played the harp to rid King Saul of a bad spirit. As early as 400 B.C., Hippocrates, Greek father of medicine, played music for his mental patients. Aristotle described music as a force that purified the emotions. In the thirteenth century, Arab hospitals contained music-rooms for the benefit of the patients. In the United States, Native American medicine men often employed chants and dances as a method of healing patients. Music therapy as we know it began in the aftermath of World Wars I and II. Musicians would travel to hospitals, particularly in the United Kingdom, and play music for soldiers suffering from war-related emotional and physical trauma.

About Joe

I began my life in the South and for five years lived as a closeted teacher, but am now making a new life for myself as an oral historian in New England. I think my life will work out the way it was always meant to be. That doesn't mean there won't be ups and downs; that's all part of life. It means I just have to be patient. I feel like October 7, 2015 is my new birthday. It's a beginning filled with great hope. It's a second chance to live my life…not anyone else's. My profile picture is "David and Me," 2001 painting by artist Steve Walker. It happens to be one of my favorite modern gay art pieces. View all posts by Joe

3 responses to “Moment of Zen: Music

  • silvereagle

    I look forward on Saturday mornings to your Moments of Zen…and this is no exception. Thanks Joe Blow!!

  • Jay M.

    great way to start the day!Thanks!Peace <3Jay

  • Mark

    You write of the joy and ministry of music — even citing David playing the harp for Saul — yet you are a member of a church that does not allow instrumental music in services. I recently played the Brahms Requiem at David Lipscomb, in Nashville, which I considered highly incongruous. It may not have been for a service, but there is no denying that the piece is sacred music, and it's usually accompanied by a big-ass orchestra. I have also played in string quartets for weddings in the C of C; also highly odd, to me, an Episcopalian.

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